Book Review- Kings of the Wyld

Last week I was lucky enough to finish Nicholas Eames fantasy comedy Kings of the Wyld. Based off a recommendation from former guest host Colin Albanese I picked up this read, which happens to be the author’s first book. What followed was an unexpectedly fun and action-packed fantasy novel. Usually when a friend sells a book, movie, or TV show so hard it usually never lives up to the hype. Well, Kings of the Wyld was more than I could have hoped.

Kings of the Wyld follows a former group of travelling warriors (in the book called a band) that went by Saga. We follow Clay Cooper, the heart of group, as he is approached by former front-man and best friend, “Glorious” Gabe. The once great frontman is weary and old. He tells Clay of a great horde lead by an ancient being that is holding a far away city siege. And who’s in the center of that dying city? Gabe’s daughter Rose, who went to the city to help the citizens with her own band. What follows is a quest to get the band back together to save Gabe’s daughter. They must get Moog, the eccentric and lovable wizard, Matrick, the drunk but skillful thief turned king, and Ganelon, the massive powerhouse of the band. What follows is adventure and danger with a group of new friends and enemies alike, all to save someone they love and in turn, the world.

Kings of the Wyld finds a perfect mix of action and Comedy. Eames find’s a way to write about the comedic moments so effortlessly it’s like they are playing out on a screen in front of us. Admittedly I am someone with a very weak constitution to violence but I never felt like this book crossed the line. It used just enough so the visuals would stir the reader but rarely ever crossed into needless. There has to be some exception when there is a nightmare horde of monsters waiting for the group in the story… I cannot recommend this read more. It feels like it goes by quick because you never want to put it down but remains intricate and builds a world that would make any D&D player go wild. It takes the classic form or fantasy and injects it with a modern energy. The use of music culture as a vessel for warrior groups is an intelligent and easy to digest concept for the audience. The book doesn’t lack emotion either. There is a wonderful sense of brotherhood between the men and it is all-inclusive, with one of the warriors lamenting the loss of his husband. This book is for everyone. And I highly recommend everyone go read it. I for one am looking forward to the sequel, Bloody Rose.

Cover Art for upcoming Bloody Rose:

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